SpaceX: Falcon Heavy rocket launch and landing

Falcon Heavy lifted off yesterday from Cape Canaveral in Florida and successfully delivered its cargo into orbit

Falcon Heavy lifted off yesterday from Cape Canaveral in Florida and successfully delivered its cargo into orbit

Roughly three minutes after clearing the pad, Heavy's two side boosters separated from the core rocket for a synchronised landing at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, sparking boisterous cheers from SpaceX engineers in the company's Hawthorne, California headquarters. The second most powerful rocket in the USA - the Delta IV Heavy - can send more than 63,000 pounds to the same location.

As well as having its first commercial payload, it was also the first time the three lower boosters of the rocket returned to Earth successfully.

More than 23 storeys in height, the Space X Falcon Heavy packs twice as much power as any other rocket on the Earth.

The Arabsat 6A is a modern communications satellite developed by Lockheed Martin for Arabsat, an organisation founded by the Arab League in 1976 to provide telecommunications services to the region.

This time all the boosters came back safely which makes this the first fully successful mission for the Falcon Heavy.

Luckily, SpaceX reminded everyone about it this week, as the company conducted the second successful launch of their Falcon Heavy rocket from NASA's Kennedy Space Center.

SpaceX and Boeing Co are vying to send humans to space from United States soil for the first time in almost a decade under NASA's Commercial Crew Program.

The fairing is a piece of material that's part of the rocket's nosecone, protecting the payload, which can include things like satellites, during launch.

Falcon Heavy carried a communications satellite for Saudi-based telecom firm Arabsat, which will beam internet and television services over Africa, Europe and the Middle East.

This would be the first time SpaceX has ever reused nosecone fairings it recovered from the ocean, and the company hasn't said a lot about the process (es) it plans to use to give the fairings a second lease on life.

In the test mission, Heavy's core booster missed the vessel and crashed into the Atlantic Ocean.

The US Air Force tapped SpaceX a year ago to launch a classified military satellite for US$130 million (S$176 million), and in February added three missions in a US$297 million contract.

SpaceX is now testing a system to recover the fairings of its Falcon 9 rockets.

Falcon Heavy lifted off yesterday from Cape Canaveral in Florida and successfully delivered its cargo into orbit.

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