Texas Man Dies After Vape Pen Explosion Severs Artery To Brain

Authorities say William Brown died after the e-cigarette he was using exploded

Authorities say William Brown died after the e-cigarette he was using exploded

She said Brown had purchased a vape pen from Smoke and Vape DZ, but shop employees told CBS 11 News the man didn't purchase anything from the store.

Steve Brown, William Brown's father, said Doctors told the family that William needed surgery to remove the piece of the pen in his neck but that it wasn't urgent so it would have to wait a day or two, the Washington Post reported.

She added that she is not interested in suing the hospital because it won't bring her grandson back.

William Brown was at a vaporizer store in Keller when it happened.

The medical examiner ruled William Brown's cause of death as penetrating trauma from an exploding vaporiser pen.

The CDC says more than one in every 10 adults has tried an e-cigarette.

"Now he's got a new address in heaven", Alice Brown said.

A spokeswoman for the JPS Health Network said she could not comment on the specifics of Brown's case because of health privacy laws. That three-piece thing went into his throat and stayed there, ' Alice said. It's not clear what type of vape pen Brown was using.

A spokeswoman for the JPS Health Network said she could not comment on specifics due to privacy laws, but said the company is continuing to communicate with Brown's family and expressed their honest condolences.

"His friends are getting together to fix the auto for him", she said.

There have been 195 incidents of explosions and fires caused by e-cigarettes reported by United States media between January 2009 and December 2016, according to a report from the Federal Emergency Management Agency.

A man has been killed just days shy of his 25th birthday after an e-cigarette exploded in his face.

This is the second death within the last twelve months as a result of an exploding electronic cigarette.

Vape pens and e-cigarettes typically come with a battery and heating element and can resemble regular cigarettes, cigars or pipes, while others resemble pens or USB sticks. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) warns that the devices can cause unintended injuries, especially if the product is defective.

Researchers found that there were an estimated 2,035 e-cigarette explosions and burn injuries in hospital emergency rooms from 2015 to 2017.

Mohamad Zayid Abdihdy was checking out a TV when his e-cigarette exploded in his trousers pocket.

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