Tough stance on caravan keeps criminals in Mexico

California assessing legal action against use of force on Mexico border

Tough stance on caravan keeps criminals in Mexico

Many plan to seek asylum in the USA but may have to wait months because the US government only processes about 100 of those cases a day at the San Ysidro border crossing in San Diego.

Ramirez and two other men were observed crossing the border a mile east of the San Ysidro, California, port of entry.

The hunger strike at the border comes nearly a week after U.S. Border Patrol officers fired tear gas at the caravan after hundreds rushed the border.

Mayor Juan Manuel Gastélum declared the migrant caravan a "humanitarian crisis" earlier this week, but he's now saying it's too much on the city, according to an exclusive with Fox News.

The migrants were part of a caravan of about 7,000 people that arrived in Tijuana two weeks ago. The San Diego Sector Border Patrol's Foreign Operations Branch corroborated the man's admission with the Honduran Consulate in Los Angeles and discovered that Ramirez served 16 years in a Honduran prison for his crime. He said they should be held accountable and face criminal charges. That prompted Border Patrol agents to launch tear gas and pepper spray balls to quell the unrest in the crowd that included small children in diapers.

Experts had expressed concerns about unsanitary conditions at the sports complex, where more than 6,000 migrants have been packed into a space adequate for half that many people.

One Honduran man tried to swim to the US side but quickly got in trouble in the rough waters of the Pacific. One of the two still unidentified males was previously deported from the US and could face federal charges for illegal re-entry.

The other adults were not prosecuted because Customs and Border Protection didn't have enough information to pursue charges, including the name of the arresting officers, according to the official, who said it was a chaotic scene.

USA authorities are working on a new system to better record evidence if similar circumstances arise, the official said. Mud, lice infestations and respiratory infections are rampant.

Honduran migrants stand at the border wall in Tijuana, Mexico, Friday, Nov. 30, 2018, before crossing over. The administration had still not shown that the ban was legal, or that any harm would come from continuing to implement existing immigration laws, Tigar said in his order.

Latest News