May faces more Brexit woes after UK minister quits

British prime minister Theresa May speaks with US president Donald Trump during the G20 summit in Buenos Aires

British prime minister Theresa May speaks with US president Donald Trump during the G20 summit in Buenos Aires

"We are talking to business about their needs". I think people need to be aware of that.

"The prime minister has been changing the public mood, if you look at what's been happening in polling there's clearly a shift there", Fox said.

"Why it is a deal that delivers on Brexit but it is also a deal that protects jobs and the economy and why passing this deal in the vote that takes place in the House of the Commons will take us to certainty for the future, and that failure to do that would only lead to uncertainty".

And the ex-cabinet minister dismissed the suggestion this would be a "denial of the democratic rights" of the 17.4 million people who voted for Brexit.

She added: "I think what we have seen revealed in numerous Labour Party's comments is that what they actually want is a general election, and that means they are not acting in the national interest, they are putting their narrow party interests first".

After the vote on December 11, Tusk will chair a crucial European Union meeting.

The motion will be signed by the pro-independence Scottish National Party and Scottish Greens and the anti-independence Labour and Liberal Democrats.

"Instead, what I see from Labour is an attempt to frustrate what the Government is doing to deliver Brexit for the British people".

DUP leader Arlene Foster and party deputy leader Nigel Dodds
DUP leader Arlene Foster and party deputy leader Nigel Dodds

He told the BBC this morning: "There is a blocking minority in the House of Commons for nearly every possible option which means that letting the people decide, now that we know more, might be the most sensible path for both Leavers and Remainers".

Mrs May said that separate analyses produced by Whitehall officials and the Bank of England this week each showed that the agreement she reached in Brussels is "the best deal that honours the result of the referendum".

We would question whether the current proposals - which do not in our view meet the requirements under Ofcom for due impartiality, nor ensure that an appropriately wide range of views are represented and given due weight in the debate (Ofcom 5.5 and 5.12 and 5.13) - are in line with those guidelines.

"A People's Vote is a practical way to get out of the constitutional crisis we are in".

But hinting at potential further resignations from Mrs May's top team over Brexit, he added: "Members of the Cabinet who don't vote for the deal won't be members of the Cabinet".

The risk for May is that if she is incapable of advancing a credible alternative path to Brexit, that infamous and elusive plan B, then Parliament will take the decision out of her hands.

"But the deal we've reached will give us a firm and stable base on which to leave the European Union and build this country's global future, a future that still encompasses Europe, of course, but also the wide fast-growing markets beyond, with all the opportunity that entails".

Writing in the Daily Telegraph, arch-Brexiteer Jacob Rees-Mogg accused the Government of an effort to "frighten and to gull (people) into acquiescing to a non-Brexit Brexit".

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