Nazis Target Oprah And Stacey Abrams In Robocalls

Oprah Winfrey

'I approve this message': Oprah makes rare political appearance in support of Georgian candidate

"To try to tie the candidacy of the Georgia Republican gubernatorial candidate Brian Kemp to the scourge of racism and even lynchings?"

A robocall apparently from a white supremacist group is injecting racism directly into the race, which has already been fraught with a race-laden debate over ballot access and voter suppression. Kemp, who oversees elections as Georgia's secretary of state, vehemently denies charges that he's used his office to make it harder for minorities to vote.

The race to decide the next governor of Georgia is nearly dead even, with Republican candidate Brian Kemp holding a slim lead in the campaign's homestretch. It also called the investigation "another example of abuse of power" by Kemp. "And to do, read and think what I told them to".

Stacey Abrams, 44, is a lawyer and novelist who served as minority leader of the Georgia House of Representatives from 2011 to 2017.

Ms Winfrey's speech came as Vice President Pence stood alongside Ms Abrams' opponent, Brian Kemp, in nearby Dalton, and mocked the billionaire media icon as just another liberal outsider trying to impose on Republican-run Georgia.

"You are disrespecting and disregarding their legacy, their suffering and their dreams when you don't vote", she added.

More high-profile visits are planned, with former President Barack Obama coming to Atlanta Friday for Abrams and President Donald Trump campaigning Sunday for Kemp.

The Georgia governor's race is one of the most closely watched campaigns in the nation and is attracting top surrogates from both parties in the final days before the election.

"While we cannot comment on the specifics of an ongoing investigation, I can confirm that the Democratic Party of Georgia is under investigation for possible cyber crimes", Press Secretary Candice Broce says in the press release.

Tensions grew after an Associated Press report in early October that more than 53,000 voter applications - almost 70 percent of them from black applicants - were on hold with Kemp's office ahead of the election.

Investigative journalism website WhoWhatWhy reported Sunday that they had received an email and document, sent from the Democratic Party of Georgia to election security experts, that highlights "massive" vulnerabilities within the state's online voter registration system. He called the controversy "manufactured". He did so under the auspices of a 2017 state law passed under his urging, which requires an "exact match" between a voter registration form and government documents.

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