Sex rarely makes heart stop beating

Men more at risk of rare heart attack after sex claims Study

Fewer than one in five men who suffer cardiac arrest during sex survive — because their partners do not know CPR

FEWER than one in five men who suffer a heart attack during sex survive, research shows.

The new study also falls in line with previous research on sex and heart attacks.

Most of the victims of sex-induced heart stoppages were taking cardiovascular medications, an indication that these people had a history of heart problems - as opposed to dying during sex with no warning.

"I'm a little surprised at the really tiny number", said study senior researcher Dr. Sumeet Chugh, medical director of the Heart Rhythm Center at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles.

In total, the scientists identified 4,557 SCAs in Portland during the 13-year study period.

Cardiac arrest is a situation in which anyone's heart can stop beating by getting a sudden shock.

Limitations to the study included unknown information surrounding the frequency of sexual activity, so researchers could not determine relative risk compared to rest and physical activity.

The authors also noted that less than a third of patients who had a heart attack during or just after sex received CPR, despite being with someone else at the time of the attack.

This differs from a heart attack, where blood flow to the heart is blocked.

"Performing CPR by bystanders until the ambulance arrives translates to significantly better survival for cardiac arrest", report author Aapo Aro said.

The researchers noted that sudden cardiac arrest kills more than 300,000 people in the US every year and physical activity, particularly when the person is not accustomed to it, is linked to a higher risk of the condition.

Compared with others who had sudden cardiac arrest, people with an arrest associated with sexual intercourse were more likely to be male (94 percent).

The study hence concludes that 1% of the cardiac arrest happens because of sex in men where the percentage is 0.1% in women.

Almost 20 percent of the sex-related hearts attack patients survived, compared to just 12.9 percent of those whose heart attacks weren't linked to sex.

The examination was introduced at a meeting of the American Heart Association.

Dr Chugh said: "These findings highlight the importance of continued efforts to educate the public on the importance of bystander CPR for sudden cardiac arrest, irrespective of the circumstance".

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