Facebook Wants Your Nudes For Their New Anti-Revenge Porn Tool

Facebook suggests users upload nudes to avoid revenge porn

Facebook asks users to upload nudes to fight revenge porn

The social media giant is testing new technology in Australia that may help combat revenge porn.

As Facebook tests the new strategy out in various countries, some state laws in the United States are making sharing non-consensual explicit images a federal crime, like child porn. The image can then be deleted, but Facebook will be able to prevent any further uploads of an image with the same digital signature. The social media empire and the small eSafety agency rigged a way to prevent people from uploading nudes in the first place, according to the Australian Broadcasting Company. It's worth noting that Facebook already has mechanisms for reporting revenge porn without preemptively sending them the images.

If the anti-revenge porn trial is successful, the program will reportedly move to the U.S., Canada and Great Britain in the future.

Grant went on to say that anyone who is concerned their intimate images could end up being posted on Facebook would first need to file a report with her office, who would then share the report with Facebook.

In the Australian pilot, users must complete a form on the e-safety commissioner's website outlining their concerns, before sending the pictures they are concerned about to themselves using Messenger. It was even the topic of a Netflix documentary titled, "Revenge Porn".

It works like this: you send Facebook your nudes, the company's software has a look and then image matching algorithms will continuously comb the site to make sure that no images matching your nudes are posted. Facebook will use their cutting-edge image matching technology to stop those images from being uploaded. The practice is now being tested in Australia before it is scheduled to make its way to the US and Canada. Once that's done, every photo like that one will be unable to be uploaded to Facebook.

Facebook will store these images for a short period of time before deleting them to ensure it is enforcing the policy correctly, the company said. Once you report an image, "specially trained representatives" from Facebook's Community Operations review it and, if it's found to be in violation of the social network's Community Standards, take it down.

While there are many high-profile revenge porn cases, such as the Blac Chyna-Kardashian case that is now making its way through the courts, there are also many cases that go unreported.

Latest News