Twitter doubles length of tweets to 280 characters

Twitter DOUBLES the length of tweets to 280 characters so you don't have to cram everything in 140 characters

Twitter officially doubles the character limit to 280 for all users

As Twitter tests new 280-character tweets, two Germans exploited a loophole in the popular social network site and sent a massive 35,000-character tweet, breaking the existing limit.

Ever since Jack Dorsey sent out his first tweet in March 2006, Twitter (TWTR) has been synonymous with a pithy 140-character limit.

Twitter Inc. is ending its 140-character limit - and giving almost everyone 280 characters. Others just want an edit button already.

In a blog post, Twitter product manager, Aliza Rosen, shared the news about the bump to 280 characters for all along with some background information on what the company found during the testing period and why it's moving forward with the change.

Users writing in Japanese, Chinese, and Korean will still be limited to 140 characters.

But Twitter said that in its initial tests, most people had only gone a little bit over 140 characters and didn't use the maximum limit.

To try and get more people Tweeting, it had a cunning plan.

Twitter claims that the changes are a good thing (because of course they're a good thing), because "only" 5% of tweets with the 280 character limit exceeded 140 characters and only 2% were over 190 characters.

The move follows a trial among a small group of users which started in September in response to criticism that it was not easy enough to tweet.

The 140-character length wasn't a random choice: Twitter's founders wanted tweets to fit in a text message, which can only hold 160 characters. When it expanded the limit to 280, only 1 percent of tweets had this issue.

The change is part of Twitter's plan to attract new users and increase growth. It also saw people with the longer character limits have more likes, retweets and mentions, get more followers and spend more time on the platform. This reflects the challenge of fitting a thought into a Tweet, often resulting in lots of time spent editing and even at times abandoning Tweets before sending.

The site now has 330 million active users.

Latest News