Liberia Supreme Court Suspends Presidential Runoff Indefinitely

George Weah former soccer player and presidential candidate of Congress for Democratic Change, votes at a polling station in Monrovia

Supreme Court considers fate of Liberia presidential runoff

The Supreme Court of Liberia has granted the opposition Liberty Party's petition for a Writ of Prohibition on the November 7 Runoff Election.

Chief Justice Francis Saye Korkpor said Monday that the electoral body had been proceeding "wrongly and illegally" to conduct a runoff between former global soccer star George Weah and Vice President Joseph Boakai while a complaint remained about the October poll.

Charles Walker Brumskine, the standard bearer for Liberty Party who defended his party's argument on Friday, was not present at Monday's ruling. His complaint was based on allegation that the first round of the presidential and legislative elections were marred by fraud and irregularities.

This time, however, the CDC accused Boakai of "trying to steal the elections from the Liberian people after over 40 years in power", in a statement emailed to journalists on October 31, after the vice president announced he would back Brumskine's actions.

Ex-football star, Mr George Weah, and incumbent Vice President Joseph Boakai, who were the two front runners in the first round, were competing in the run-off.

Chief Justice Francis Korkpor said the court would issue a decision on Monday at 10am (1000 GMT) over whether the runoff between former worldwide footballer George Weah and incumbent Vice-President Joseph Boakai would proceed.

The election was due to be Liberia's first democratic transition in seven decades, and west African leaders met with all sides of the conflict on Wednesday in an attempt to ease the crisis.

The Unity Party are backing the legal challenge against the initial vote.

"Hopefully Ecowas can continue to make its presence felt, to urge the Liberian political leaders to play by the rules and not to do anything that would undermine the wishes of the Liberian people", he said.

The Supreme Court found that the fraud case was enough to suspend indefinitely the runoff as the electoral commission deals with Brumskine's complaint.

"Until the rule of law is respected in Liberia, holding a runoff or any election is irrelevant".

The president responded by denying that the meetings were inappropriate.

Boakai's Unity Party signed a letter accusing the president of "interference" by meeting polling officials at her home before the election, and he maintains "there is a reason to raise qualms" if the meeting was indeed at her residence.

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