Broadcom Offers $103 Billion for Qualcomm in Chip Megadeal

Qualcomm declined to comment while Broadcom did not immediately respond to a request for comment

Qualcomm declined to comment while Broadcom did not immediately respond to a request for comment

Broadcom's offer is at a premium of 27.6 percent to Qualcomm's closing price of $54.84 on Thursday, a day before media reports of a potential deal pushed up the company's shares.

Japanese telecoms firm SoftBank has already agreed a deal to buy British semiconductor firm Arm, while Intel bought Altera, and Qualcomm has agreed a deal for NXP.

Following rumors over the weekend, chipmaker Broadcom has today confirmed it has approached wireless chipmaker Qualcomm with an acquisition offer that values the company at $130BN (including $25BN of net debt).

Still, analysts expect Qualcomm management to reject the $70-per-share price Broadcom is offering as too low.

Broadcom president and CEO Hock Tan said the bid was "compelling for stockholders and stakeholders in both companies".

The bid comes as Broadcom plans to move its headquarters to the United States from Singapore.

Qualcomm is trying to close its $38-billion acquisition of NXP Semiconductors NV, one of the largest makers of chips for vehicles and expanding into self-driving technology.

Shares of Broadcom have rallied this year while Qualcomm has fallen, making the target more vulnerable. According to reports people involved with Broadcom believe that it will not shy away from initiating a "proxy fight to gain seats on Qualcomm's board of directors in support of its offer".

Broadcom also is waiting on regulatory approval to purchase San Jose's Brocade Communication Systems for $5.9 billion. The forward price-to-earnings ratio for Broadcom recently stood at 14.6, slightly above its 13.5 average. The statement said that there would be no further comment from the company until the assessment was completed. Moreover, it would create a company with "massive market share" in the kind of chips that power Wi-Fi, location data and Bluetooth, necessary for the next generation of connected devices, said Stuart Carlaw, chief research officer at ABI Research.

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