There Are Strict New Rules For Anyone Flying To The US

NATION-NOW     New 'security interviews' to begin for fliers on U.S. bound flights     
      'Security interviews to begin for U.S. bound flights

NATION-NOW New 'security interviews' to begin for fliers on U.S. bound flights 'Security interviews to begin for U.S. bound flights

More regular pat-downs, heightened checks on personal electronic devices, more screening by dogs and tighter security protocols around aircraft and in passenger areas are also expected. Officials gave airlines 120 days to comply with the measures; the deadline was October 26. Yesterday was the deadline.

"The security measures affect all individuals, worldwide passengers and U.S. citizens, travelling to the United States from a last point of departure global location", said Lisa Farbstein, a spokeswoman for the TSA.

Some carriers, such as Air France, plan to get fliers to fill out a short form.

The measures will be rolled out for 180 airlines operating out of 280 airports in 105 countries.

In Hong Kong, Cathay Pacific has suspended in-town check-in services as well as self-bag drop services for passengers booked on flights to the USA, except for those travelling on Flight CX888 to NY via Vancouver.

Airlines contacted by Reuters said the new measures could include short security interviews with passengers at check-in or the boarding gate, sparking concerns over flight delays and extended processing time.

Norwegian Air, for example, has said its passengers flying to the States would receive instructions via text regarding the new procedures and that it would be opening check-in desks for U.S. flights four hours before departure.

In March, the USA banned passengers from taking large electrical devices such as laptops on board flights from eight mainly Muslim countries over security fears.

The United States announced the new rules in June to end its restrictions on carry-on electronic devices on planes coming from 10 airports in eight countries in the Middle East and North Africa in response to concerns that explosives could be hidden in electronic devices. Travellers were told they had to check in the devices. "We were already doing so by strict checking of passport and visas at check-in counters and also asking (some) passengers about the goal of their visit and baggage content".

The new rules also come at the end of a 120-day deadline for airlines to meet new United States regulations following the ban on laptops in airplane cabins of some Mideast airlines being lifted.

The new security measures come after the Trump administration previously rolled out a laptop ban and travel bans that have thrown the worldwide travel industry into disarray. Ultimately, it will have to be the passenger.

"It has to be done, and it is additional cost. I don't think the costs have been estimated, but they have been significant", he said.

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