Trump Visits Florida to Assess Hurricane Irma Damage

Books by President Donald Trump and about him on a display in the Moscow House of Books in Moscow Russia

President Trump To Visit Hurricane-Stricken Florida Thursday

President Trump will visit Puerto Rico later this month to view the recovery efforts from Hurricane Irma's landfall this week. Trump said then, "if they have to go higher, they'll go higher, frankly".

According to The Hill, the Federal Aviation Administration posted a travel advisory Tuesday that covers Fort Myers, a step that typically proceeds a presidential visit. He visited Texas and Louisiana after Harvey struck.

The first lady says she's set to meet with FEMA and "people affected by #HurricaneIrma", tweeting out a video as she lifts off from the South Lawn en route to Joint Andrews air force base. Another told Trump that he "married well".

Approximately 2 million Floridians have now had their power restored, but 4.9 million people across the peninsula were still without power Thursday.

"The WALL, which is already under construction in the form of new renovation of old and existing fences and walls, will continue to be built", Trump said in one of Thursday's stream of tweets.

"They're way ahead of schedule, there are more electrical people in this state than I think accumulated anywhere in the world, added Mr. Trump".

The president monitored the storm over the weekend from Camp David, the presidential retreat in Maryland.

Florida's southwestern coast is a haven for retirees seeking warm weather and handsome sunsets across the Gulf of Mexico.

The Naples Municipal Airport also reported a gust of 142 miles per hour, near reports of 135mph gust and sustained winds of 93mph - the most powerful recorded gusts on the mainland.

In Lee County, which includes Cape Coral and Fort Myers, the Florida Emergency Management Agency said 66 percent of the area's 290,000 electrical customers were still without power Wednesday. Gas stations along the way advertised that they didn't have fuel. Days after Irma passed, nearly 80 percent of homes and businesses were still without electricity, and floodwaters still covered some communities entirely.

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