YouTube: no ads until your channel has 10000 views

YouTube Now Requires Partners to Have At Least 10000 Channel Views Before They Get Paid

YouTube channels must now hit 10K views to start earning ad revenue

YouTube will no longer place ads on videos will less than 10,000 total views, the company told the Wall Street Journal.

The move is primarily aimed at weeding out abuse in the form of those who upload and re-upload original content and "try to earn revenue from it". The company announced last month a handful of changes to its advertising systems created to give brands more control over where their ads appear. YouTube said that the new 10,000-view threshold will help it gather enough information to determine whether a channel is legit, and if it is following the service's community guidelines and advertising policies.

Qingzhen Chen, senior analyst for advertising research from IHS, said it would not be hard for most channel creators to get 10,000 views from a global audience of more than one billion users. YouTube users who apply for Partner Program access can check the status of their application in the Creator Studio's "Channel" tab.

Once they reach that threshold, YouTube will review those channels against their policies to see if they're okay to begin making money. Anyone could apply to have their videos monetized, and advertisers could have access to more obscure audiences while providing a living to smaller channels. After the successful review, the ads will be served with the content.

YouTube announced yesterday via a blog post that the company will no longer be serving ads on YouTube Partner Program videos until the channel reaches 10k lifetime views. YouTube offers creators a 55% share of the ad revenue from pre-roll ads that appear in of their videos.

From now on, channels won't be able to make money until their videos have generated 10,000 views.

Now, YouTube has found a way to stop these practices and protect its creators who are playing by the rules at the same time. The Google-owned site first introduced the YouTube Partner Program for ad-revenue sharing back in 2007.

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