Putin: Subway bombing shows terrorism threat isn't subsiding

Kyrgyz-born Russian citizen Akbarzhon Dzhalilov

Kyrgyz-born Russian citizen Akbarzhon Dzhalilov

A bomb exploded in a carriage of the St. Petersburg subway on Monday killing 14 people and injuring 50 others.

People gather at a symbolic memorial at Technologicheskiy Institute subway station in St. Petersburg, Russia, Tuesday, April 4, 2017.

The city has been place on a high alert level since the subway bombing Monday.

Kyrgyzstan's State Committee for National Security said in a statement that one suspect behind the bombing is a Kyrgyz-born Russian national it identified as Akbarzhon Dzhalilov.

The explosion had taken place in a crowded metro train near St Petersburg which is the historic city centre as Russian President Vladimir Putin was visiting the city.

St. Petersburg is home to a large diaspora of people from Kyrgyzstan and other ex-Soviet republics in Central Asia, who flee poverty and unemployment in their home countries for jobs in Russian Federation.

Russia's top investigative body says more people have been arrested in connection with the suicide bombing of a subway train in St. Petersburg that killed 13 passengers.

"We didn't expect to hear such news today", said the woman, who spoke on condition of anonymity because she feared for her personal safety.

The Russian business daily Kommersant said that security agencies had learned of a terror plot in St. Petersburg from a Russian man affiliated with IS who had come from Syria.

"We know that each of our countries, practically every one, is a possible and potential target of terrorist attacks", he said.

Russian investigators on Tuesday said the bomb on the St.

According to the Investigative Committee of Russian Federation on Wednesday, the suspects were accused of recruiting people for terror groups such as the Islamist former al-Qaida branch Jabhat Fateh al-Sham (formerly known as the Nusra Front) and the IS, Efe news reported.

SIEGEL: And the fact that the suspected suicide bomber was from Kyrgyzstan - what does that say to Russians, and what does Kyrgyzstan connote in the context of Islamism? The foreign ministry of the Central Asian nation of Kazakhstan said one of its citizens was killed in the attack.

The bomb went off Monday afternoon as the train was moving between two stations.

Russia's health minister raised the death toll to 14, including the bomber.

But then later in the day, Russia's investigative committee said that its investigators had concluded that they had found forensic evidence of genetic traces of Akbarjon Djalilov on a bag that contained an explosive device that was found disarmed at a separate subway station not very far from the site of yesterday's explosion.

Latest News