Distracted driving can be deadly

The Boston roads where the most distracted driving events occurred all shared a common theme they are all heavily congested during rush hour which may be why drivers get distracted by their phones so often as they sit in traffic

Distracted driving can be deadly

Patrol officers will focus on distracted driving, specifically drivers using a hand-held device to talk or text.

Greenwich Police are warning residents to put their cell phones away or be prepared to pay.

"The message is out, and people know that distracted driving is risky", said Dr. Kelly Browning, Executive Director of Impact Teen Drivers.

Lt. Kraig Gray said that with the prevalence of social media, and so many people flouting distracted driving laws, might have resulted in normalizing of the behavior.

The driver of a pickup truck that collided with a church minibus in rural Texas last week, killing 13 people, apologized after the crash and acknowledged that he had been texting while driving, a witness told the Associate Press. "Compared to the year before, that's a 10 percent increase". The NHTSA reports that 3,477 people were killed and an estimated 391,000 injured in motor vehicle collisions involving distracted drivers in 2015. "And you'll see influx of other state ads, like click it or ticket advising people it's inherently unsafe", said Traffic Sergeant Pat Smyth.

While mobile phone use is the most recognizable driving distraction, other high-risk activities that can take your eyes or mind off the road include adjusting a music player, grooming, eating or programming a navigation system.

"Pretty soon I'm doing this and it's just like that". If you need to text, pull over and park your vehicle in a safe place first.

Gray said Greenwich Police could could give out endless tickets for texting and driving and never do any other police work. "If you want to send a text and you have a passenger inside the vehicle have that person send the text for you", added Corporal Henry.

If you get caught with your cell phone to your ear or texting, you could face a $136 fine.

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